Tips For A Spectacular Double Exposure

Tips For A Spectacular Double Exposure

Now comes the exciting part. Remember that the artist is you here. The camera or the editing programs are a simple “tool,” but the creator of the photograph is you.

I bring you a few tips just like here; https://skylum.com/blog/10-tips-for-double-exposure-photography that will shorten the path of learning and allow you to start producing memorable photographs from the start. Tips and advice that most of the photographers in this area already apply and I would like you to know from now:

Tips For A Spectacular Double Exposure

  • Try always to include a human or animal factor in the composition. One of the two photos must contain a person, animal or animated living being. The other photo may contain an element of nature: trees, flowers, vegetation, etc. Basically, we are fusing something alive that has emotions and facial expressions, with something static that is nature, a pattern, something that serves as a background. It usually gives excellent results.
  • The photo in which the subject appears, person or animal, tries to shoot it against the light. The more “silhouette” appears, and the more “dark” the person comes out, the better result you will get.
  • The second photo, the one of the environment, nature, wall or trees, which will shoot it with a correct lighting level. You do not need to be underexposed. The idea is to create a contrast between the first (dark subject) and the other (well-exposed environment).
  • As it comes to merging 2 photos, be careful not to fall into a final photograph too loaded with colors. To avoid this, try to keep a minimum number of colors in each of them. The first photo that does not have more than 2 predominant colors, and the second because maybe 1 or 2 colors at most, predominant. Mount it all with the dominant color (or 2 colors) you want the final photograph to have in mind.
  • If it is too complicated to eliminate the excess of different colors, how about we work the photo with the idea of producing something in Black and White?
  • The orientation of the two shots does not have to coincide. You can invert the meaning of a photo (from horizontal to vertical) so you can merge it with an initially vertical one. (See example previous photo, in which upright trees have been photographed in the background).
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